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How Young Children Learn
Volume 74, Program 17
4/24/2007
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Did you ever watch a baby struggle to crawl or a 3-year-old learn a new word and wonder, “What’s going on in that little head?” Then tune in to today’s Home School Heartbeat, as Mike Smith talks with our guest about how young children learn.

Mike Smith:
Mrs. Oberlander, you told us last time that children are deeply impacted by what they learn before the age of 5. So what does the learning process look like for a very young child? In other words, what teaching techniques can parents use to help their children?

June Oberlander:
Well, learning begins at birth. And at this age, a baby’s five senses are keenly aware, and they use these senses for what they see, they hear, they feel, they smell, and they taste. His gross motor and fine skills are developing rapidly, too, and this also helps with learning. I feel that children learn best through meaningful play experiences because play is a child’s work. And I feel that the more enriching experiences that young children encounter, it determines to a large degree how they learn. The learning of basic readiness skills should be age-appropriate and developmental. The simpler readiness skills I think should be mastered before attempting to teach more-advanced skills. Sometimes parents try to rush their children and this is not a good idea. Strengths and weaknesses should be noted, and the child’s strengths can be used to help him to overcome his weaknesses.

Mike:
Well, thank you very much. And until next time, I’m Mike Smith.


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Program Offer

Written by a retired kindergarten teacher, this book shows you when, how, and what skills to develop in your child from birth to age 5.The 260 developmental activities take only about 10 minutes each and use common household items. Slow and Steady also contains measurable parameters for profiling your child’s early development and tips for solving behavior problems.

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