Home School Court Report
Current Issue | Archives | Advertising | About | Search
VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 2
- disclaimer -
March / April 2005


FEATURES
Taylor broke ground with NCAA
Judicial Tyranny Goes Global
Let the Facts Speak

DEPARTMENTS
Freedom watch
From the heart

Realizing dreams

For more information

From the director

HSF Mission Statement
Across the states
Members only
Active cases
About campus

PHC grad wins prize for economics paper
President's page

ET AL.

On the other hand: a Contrario Sensu

HSLDA social services contact policy/A plethora of forms

HSLDA legal inquiries


 «
  LEGAL/LEGISLATIVE UPDATES  

» 


ACROSS THE STATES

CA · CT · FL · HI · IL · IN · IA · KS · LA · MA · MI · MN · NE · NY · NC · OH · OK · RI · SD · TX · VA · DC · WI

MINNESOTA

Facing the opposition

Homeschoolers have faced opposition from many sources over the past 20 years. Most recently in Minnesota, Larry Andersen of the Austin School Board introduced a motion at the Minnesota School Boards Association (MSBA) Delegate Assembly, which met December 5–6, 2004. This motion would have applied the standards of the No Child Left Behind Act to homeschooling by requiring homeschool teachers to be college educated, requiring all homeschool tests to be proctored by licensed teachers in a public school, and requiring homeschool students to take all the standardized tests that public school students must take.

Delegate Andersen's resolution is similar to the one introduced every year at the national convention of the National Education Association (NEA). The difference in this case is that school board delegates are elected officials, while NEA delegates are professional public educators. E ducrats do not have to consider the wishes of the American people, while elected officials must.

The results of this difference can be seen in the fate of the two resolutions. The NEA regularly passes resolutions recommending that every lawfully homeschooling family's freedoms should be restricted. The MSBA Board of Directors, however, recommended that Delegate Andersen's harmful resolution not be passed, and it was ultimately withdrawn.

— by Scott W. Somerville