The Home School Court Report
VOLUME XV, NUMBER 4
- disclaimer -
JULY / AUGUST 1999
Cover
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Cover Story
What Did the Founders Say? A Strategy to Bring Original Intent Back to U.S. Courts

Special Features
House Protects Liberty—When Money Is at Stake

Debate: The Clash of Skill, Wit, and Ideas

PHC Breaks New Ground

Touched By An Angel Responds to Home Schooler’s Concerns

National Center Reports
Straight A’s Bill Introduced

Marriage Penalty Tax Relief

New Plan Allows SSN Alternative for IRS Deductions

The Beginning of the End:National Teaching Certificates and Goals 2000

Military Recuitment of Home Schoolers Increasing

Across the States
State by State

Regular Features
Press Clippings

A Contrario Sensu

Prayer and Praise

Litigation Report

President’s Page

H  O  M  E     S  C  H  O  O  L  I  N  G     N  E  W  S     F  R  O  M
Across the States
AL · CA · DE · GA · HI · ID · IL · KY · LA · MD · MS · MT · NC · NE · NV · NY · OH · OR · SC · SD · TN · TX · WV · WY

Home School Heartbeat in South Carolina

Chester
WGCD
1490
AM
Columbia
WQXL
1470
AM
Gaffney
WFGN
1180
AM
Greenville
WLFJ
660
AM
Greenwood
WHZK
97.7
LPFM
Holly Hill
WJBS
1440
AM
Lake City
WPDT
105.1
FM
Lexington
WBAJ
890
AM
Marion
WJAY
1280
AM
South Carolina

Religious Freedom Act Becomes Law
    On June 1, 1999, Governor James Hodges signed into law the South Carolina Religious Freedom Act. Sponsored by Representative George Campsen (R-112) and originally designated as House Bill 3158, the new law adopts the compelling interest test in all cases in which the free exercise of religion is substantially burdened. In order to justify a law which substantially burdens a person’s right to free exercise of religion, the state has the burden of proving that it is the least restrictive means of furthering the compelling state interest. If a person’s exercise of religion has been burdened in violation of the act, the person may assert the violation as a claim or defense in a judicial proceeding. If the person prevails in such a proceeding, the court is required to award attorney’s fees and court costs.
    South Carolina now joins a growing number of states to enact religious freedom laws adopting the compelling interest test to free exercise of religion. Such action has been prompted in part by the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in 1997 that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) passed by Congress was unconstitutional. The RFRA was federal legislation intended to restore the compelling interest test, but the Supreme Court said that the Congress had exceeded its authority in doing so.