The Home School Court Report
VOLUME XV, NUMBER 4
- disclaimer -
JULY / AUGUST 1999
Cover
Previous Issue  C  O  N  T  E  N  T  S  Next Issue


Cover Story
What Did the Founders Say? A Strategy to Bring Original Intent Back to U.S. Courts

Special Features
House Protects Liberty—When Money Is at Stake

Debate: The Clash of Skill, Wit, and Ideas

PHC Breaks New Ground

Touched By An Angel Responds to Home Schooler’s Concerns

National Center Reports
Straight A’s Bill Introduced

Marriage Penalty Tax Relief

New Plan Allows SSN Alternative for IRS Deductions

The Beginning of the End:National Teaching Certificates and Goals 2000

Military Recuitment of Home Schoolers Increasing

Across the States
State by State

Regular Features
Press Clippings

A Contrario Sensu

Prayer and Praise

Litigation Report

President’s Page

H  O  M  E     S  C  H  O  O  L  I  N  G     N  E  W  S     F  R  O  M
Across the States
AL · CA · DE · GA · HI · ID · IL · KY · LA · MD · MS · MT · NC · NE · NV · NY · OH · OR · SC · SD · TN · TX · WV · WY

Home School Heartbeat in New York

Albany
WDCD
1540
AM
Albion
WJCA
102.1
FM
Arcade
WCOF
89.5
FM
Barneveld
WGLU
106.1
FM
Bath
FAMILY LIFE NETWORK
88.8
SATELL
Bath
WCIK
103.1
FM
Canandaigua
WCIY
88.9
FM
Canandaigua
WRWL Ministries


Cherry Valley
WJIV
101.9
FM
Clyde
WCOV
93.7
FM
Clyde
WCU
88.9
FM
Cortland
WDRX
100.7
FM
Cortland
WDRX
100.7
FM
East Syracuse
WSIV
1540
AM
East Syracuse
WVOA
103.9
FM
Elmira
WCIH
90.3
FM
Farmington
WZXV
99.7
FM
Fingerlakes Region
Southern Gospel for CNY
INTERNET

Friendship
WCID
89.1
FM
Horseheads
WLNL
1000
AM
Jamestown
WCOT
90.9
FM
Milan
Ignite Ministries


Olivebridge
WFSO
88.3
FM
Sidney
WCDO
100.9
FM
Spencer
WCII
88.5
FM
Syracuse
MARS HILL NETWORK
888
SATELL
Syracuse
WMHI
94.7
FM
Syracuse
WMHN
89.3
FM
Syracuse
WMHR
102.9
FM
Warsaw
WCOU
88.3
FM
Waverly
Extreme Christian Radio


New York

Increase in Compulsory Attendance Age
    With the enactment of Assembly Bill 2977-B on June 17, 1999, New York has increased its compulsory school age from 16 to “seventeen years of age or such older age as determined by the school district.” The language of the compulsory attendance statute requires the child to remain in attendance until the last day of the session in the school year in which the child becomes 17 years of age or any older age specified by the local school district. Since the compulsory attendance law only applies to minors, local school districts may not increase the age beyond 18.
    Because of the change in the law, students in a home instruction program will continue to be subject to the regulatory requirements of Section 100.10 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education for at least one year longer than is now required. Local school districts may elect to extend the time for compliance even longer. An exception to the compulsory attendance requirements continues to exist for students who have completed a four-year high school course of study, even though they may be less than 17 years old or younger than the compulsory attendance age adopted by their local school district. In other words, if a student has completed high school, that student is no longer subject to the compulsory attendance age no matter what it may be.
    This legislation is the most liberal expansion of a compulsory school attendance law in the nation in recent history. New York now becomes the only state in the nation authorizing local school districts to require school attendance beyond the ages designated by the legislature.
    Home School Legal Defense Association and New York’s largest statewide support group, Loving Education At Home (LEAH), monitored the progress of this legislation since it was introduced this past January. During discussions with those closely associated with the legislation in Albany, we were given the impression that the bill might be amended to provide a complete exemption from compulsory attendance for parents conducting home instruction programs. Several versions of proposed amendments were offered for consideration, but none of them were adopted before the legislature began to move quickly to vote on this bill. It passed the assembly on June 16, 1999, and then passed the senate the next day.
    The silver lining to this legislation is that it does not go into effect until July 1, 2000.