The Home School Court Report
VOLUME XV, NUMBER 4
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JULY / AUGUST 1999
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Cover Story
What Did the Founders Say? A Strategy to Bring Original Intent Back to U.S. Courts

Special Features
House Protects Liberty—When Money Is at Stake

Debate: The Clash of Skill, Wit, and Ideas

PHC Breaks New Ground

Touched By An Angel Responds to Home Schooler’s Concerns

National Center Reports
Straight A’s Bill Introduced

Marriage Penalty Tax Relief

New Plan Allows SSN Alternative for IRS Deductions

The Beginning of the End:National Teaching Certificates and Goals 2000

Military Recuitment of Home Schoolers Increasing

Across the States
State by State

Regular Features
Press Clippings

A Contrario Sensu

Prayer and Praise

Litigation Report

President’s Page

H  O  M  E     S  C  H  O  O  L  I  N  G     N  E  W  S     F  R  O  M
Across the States
AL · CA · DE · GA · HI · ID · IL · KY · LA · MD · MS · MT · NC · NE · NV · NY · OH · OR · SC · SD · TN · TX · WV · WY

Home School Heartbeat in Montana

Billings
KHDN
1230
AM
Glendive
KGLE
590
AM
Hardin
KBSR
1490
AM
Montana

Moving in the Right Direction
    Although the legislative proposal did not get beyond the committee level, the Montana legislature considered a bill introduced by Representative Rick Jore (R-73) to repeal the compulsory school attendance law. The wisdom of this bill was seen in its preamble:

    WHEREAS, children are properly the wards of parents, not of the state, and compulsory attendance laws presuppose just the opposite; and

    WHEREAS, the responsibility, both legally and before God, for the education of children lies with the parents, not with the state; therefore, the parents, not the state, must be able to exercise authority over the education of the children; and

    WHEREAS, there are no Montana constitutional provisions warranting compulsory attendance statutes, making the statutes of questionable validity and inviting tension among parents, lawmakers, educators, and law-enforcement officers; and

    WHEREAS, compulsory attendance laws are doubtful contributors to the literacy rate of the state, it being evident that mere attendance at a school does not constitute education or guarantee the acquisition of literary skills, nor does absence from school preclude a child’s development of academic skills; thus, compulsory attendance satisfies no “compelling interest” of the state.

    One of Home School Legal Defense Association’s goals is the repeal of all compulsory attendance laws across the nation. Remarkably, this idea is gaining support within the public school system because of the disciplinary problems encountered with students who do not want to be there and are disruptive to the educational environment. Other states should be encouraged to introduce legislation similar to this bill.