The Home School Court Report
VOLUME V, NUMBER II
- disclaimer -
Summer 1989
Cover
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Cover Stories

Governor Signs North Dakota's Home Schooling Law

Pennsylvania Handicap Case Ends in Victory

Kansas Home Schoolers Survive Another Year

Hawaii Must Re-Adopt Regulations

California Report

Florida Holds the Line

Name That Bill or The Night of the Toxic Home Schoolers…

Maine and Massachusetts Resolve Conflicts

Iowa Cracks Down on Home Schools

HSLDA Employee Changes

Home Schoolers Continue to Win In The Legislatures

Victory For Home Schoolers In Ohio

Virginia Home Schoolers Make Progress

Michigan Suffers Setback Before Court of Appeals

Religious Freedom Case Victory Helps Home Schoolers

EEE Validity Attacked in South Carolina Suit

Features

President's Corner

Across the States

A C R O S S   T H E   S T A T E S

AL IN TX

Alabama

Still Uncertain

In Alabama, home schoolers survived another year operating under the church school exemption. Many of the initial threats against certain families that took place at the beginning of the year never materialized due to the efforts of the HSLDA legal staff. More and more churches are beginning to see the need of operating a ministry to home schoolers in order to provide legal support for them. In the political arena, an attempt to lower the minimum compulsory attendance age was defeated due to the heavy lobbying of the Alabama Home Educators.

As the beginning of the new year approaches, some school districts have already questioned the legitimacy of home schools operating as ministries of churches. In Fayette, the superintendent thought home schools could only operate if instruction is given by a certified teacher. After a talk with HSLDA's Chris Klicka, the church school administrator, the family, and the State Department of Education, the superintendent withdrew his challenge admitting that this was a “grey area.” Several other counties are also threatening action against home schoolers and HSLDA’s legal staff is negotiating to prevent prosecution.