The Home School Court Report
VOLUME III, NUMBER I
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Jan - Feb.doc
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Cover Stories

Across the Nation

Denying Constitutional Rights for Money

Pennsylvania Under Fire

Contact Countdown

New York Tightens Up

South Carolina Disapproves

Onslaught in Michigan

Ohio Cases Increase

How to Correspond with Your School District

Present Legal Climate in California

Texas Drags On

Homeschoolers Excel

Features

President’s Corner

C O V E R   S T O R Y

Homeschoolers Excel

By Beth Bowen

A random sampling survey of HSLDA members was conducted in June and July by an independent educational research consultant, Lauri Scogin, BS, MA. Three hundred HSLDA homeschool families were surveyed from all over the United States. The main purpose of the survey was to compare the standardized test scores of homeschooled children with their grade level.

Out of 591 children surveyed, standardized test results were available for 241 already homeschooled children. Approximately 63% of the families had been homeschooling two or more years. In reading, 18.6% of the homeschooled students surveyed are at their grade level or up to eleven months above, and 72.61% are one year or more above. In math, 29.46% of the students are at their grade level or eleven months above, and 49.79% are one year or more above.

The educational background of the parents was also studied, revealing that 45% of the parents have a college degree or higher. Over 50% of the parents teaching their children at home only have a high school diploma.

Interestingly enough, in all of HSLDA’s homeschool cases, lack of education or progress of the children has not been questioned. Instead, the issue always involved some technicality of the compulsory attendance law relating to the regulation of the method or process of education. The real issue of whether the children are in fact receiving an education is usually ignored by the courts. With 91% scoring at or above their grade level in reading, and 79% scoring at or above their grade level in math, standardized test scores clearly indicate that homeschooled children are doing as well as, and in most instances, better than they would be if they were in the public school system.