The Home School Court Report
VOLUME II, NUMBER I
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Cover
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Cover Stories

Homeschools make an impact

Families continue to join HSLDA

Contact countdown for August through November, 1985

Victories in Connecticut

Onslaught in Ohio

Features

Across the States

C O V E R   S T O R Y

Victories in Connecticut

Three HSLDA families were contacted by school officials in Connecticut by their respective school districts. The Dionne family went before their local school board and presented their homeschool program as required by state law and the state department of education regulations. The family was rejected by the school board, and what seemed to be nothing but a formality turned into a crisis. The Dionnes contacted HSLDA’s office and the staff immediately went into action. Chris Klicka called the school district and discovered that the family was rejected solely on the basis of “socialization.” Knowing that the assumption that the children were not properly socialized would never stand up in court, Klicka inquired whether the family could have a rehearing. He then instructed the family to formally request a rehearing, which was granted.

HSLDA then secured a local Hartford attorney, Joseph Secola, who was experienced in constitutional issues and Connecticut’s education law. He attended the rehearing with the Dionne family before the school board. Secola only allowed the Dionnes to answer certain questions and then he delivered a brief but thorough argument in favor of the Dionnes explaining their constitutional rights. The school board reversed their earlier decision and recognized the Dionnes’ right to homeschool their children.

A few weeks later, the Pelkey family met before their local school board. Prior to the meeting, the HSLDA staff sent a letter to the school district explaining the Pelkeys’ program. The Pelkeys had a successful presentation to the school board and their program was “approved.”