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Vol. XXVI
No. 5
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September/October
2010

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- disclaimer -
Send Your Story About Why Homeschooling is the Best!

We are looking for humorous, warm anecdotes and true stories illustrating that homeschooling is the best educational alternative around.

All material printed in the Court Report will be credited, and the contributor will receive a $10 coupon good toward any HSLDA publication of his choice. Submissions may be edited for space. Please be aware that we cannot return photographs.

Mail submissions to:

Attn: Stories, HSLDA
P.O. Box 3000
Purcellville, VA 20134

Or email us (include “Stories” in the subject line) at: ComDept@hslda.org



Hearing The Word and Doing It?

We usually read a Proverb each day at breakfast. I sometimes wonder if it’s a little over the boys’ heads, even though we talk about what each Proverb means. (Our boys are 7 years, 5 years, and 16 months old.)

One day my oldest son’s schoolwork involved writing the opposites of several listed words, one of which was work. Of course, I was expecting something like play for his answer.

“The opposite of work ... let’s see,” he mused. “Oh, I know, it’s sluggard!”

As I started to help him spell the word, he changed his mind. “The answer is really sluggard, but I can spell lazy by myself, and it’s easier to write. I’ll write lazy instead.”

—by Erin R. / Pueblo West, CO

Whatchamacallit

My 3rd-grade daughter was reviewing contractions and compounds in her spelling curriculum. One week, when her spelling lesson contained three compound words, I asked my daughter if she saw the two smaller words in each of the larger words. She told me she did, so I asked,

“What do we call the larger word made of two smaller words?”

“Um ... contraptions?”

—by Joanna R. / Hutchinson, KS

A Battle of a Different Sort

During an oral quiz on the Civil War people and places we had discussed the day before, I asked my daughters whether they remembered what happened at Appomattox.

Because I am a physician, the 10-year-old’s answer was especially amusing: “I don’t remember for sure, but it sounds like a disease to me!”

—by Kim L. / Whitestown, IN

That’s One Big Bonfire!

One day, I decided to review with my kids what to do in the case of an emergency. After going over several different scenarios, I asked my kids how to respond in the event of a house fire.

We must have enjoyed s’mores on one too many camping trips, since my 4-year-old blurted out, “Go get the marshmallows!”

—by Judy L. / Chandler, AZ

Shopping on an Empty Stomach?

I took our children, including our then 2½-year-old son, to a regional supermarket whose mascot is a pig wearing a butcher’s hat. The pig is on the big sign out front, all throughout the store, and even on the cart corrals in the parking lot.

Always looking for homeschool teaching opportunities, I asked my son, “A.J., what is this on the Piggly Wiggly sign?”

I was hoping for the obvious response, “A pig,” but A.J. saw it differently. After looking at the sign for a few seconds, he boldly proclaimed, “Ham!”

—by the G. family / Columbus, GA

Suddenly, Folly Sounds Quite Nice ...

The other morning, we read the ninth chapter of Proverbs as part of our usual family devotions. The last verse fell to my older sister. Speaking of the woman Folly, the verse says, “But little do they know that the dead are there, that her guests are in the depths of the grave.”

Thinking my older sister had made a mistake, my 2-year-old sister piped up, “You mean the gravy!”

—by J.D.M. (17) / Port Orchard, WA

Eyes on the Prize

As my children approached the end of the school year and their textbooks, we were in an elevator chatting with a fellow passenger. The woman asked my second child what grade she was in.

In a proud voice, Anna replied, “In 15 pages, I’ll be in 2nd grade.” I’m not sure the woman understood, but Anna knew what her goal was!

—by Helen M. / Holland, MI

Taking God at His Word

In our homeschool, we strive to instill Scripture and life skills alongside academics. The former two recently combined in a humorous way with our 7-year-old daughter.

Madeline struggles with brushing her hair by herself, particularly in the back. The other day she sighed in exasperation as she fought the knots out of the back of her hair.

“Mom,” she said, “I guess I’ll just have to trust God for the things I cannot see.”

—by Karen K. / Suisun City, CA

Wrong Aisle, Wrong Store

At a local grocery store, my husband consulted his shopping list and mused, “If I were shoestrings, where would I be?”

“Walmart,” my son replied.

—by Teri J. / Winchester, VA