The Home School Court Report
Vol. XXVI
No. 3
Cover
May/June
2010

In This Issue

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- disclaimer -
Send Your Story About Why Homeschooling is the Best!

We are looking for humorous, warm anecdotes and true stories illustrating that homeschooling is the best educational alternative around.

All material printed in the Court Report will be credited, and the contributor will receive a $10 coupon good toward any HSLDA publication of his choice. Submissions may be edited for space. Please be aware that we cannot return photographs.

Mail submissions to:

Attn: Stories, HSLDA
P.O. Box 3000
Purcellville, VA 20134

Or email us (include “Stories” in the subject line) at: ComDept@hslda.org



Counting the Advantages

During my 6-year-old son’s annual physical, the nurse practitioner asked how he was adjusting to school. Upon learning we were homeschooling, she began to question us more thoroughly. When I stated that my son could read well above his grade level, she pulled out a book and asked him to read it to her. He did so, with ease. She then asked him if he could count to 10.

Highly insulted at being asked to demonstrate a skill he had mastered by 18 months of age, he threw me an imploring look. Before either of us could answer, my 2-year-old daughter piped up: “Uno, dos, tres, cuatro, cinco, seis . . .”

—Kristin W. / North Andover, MA



One Step at a Time

One evening, my husband asked my 5-year-old daughter what she had learned that day in school. She replied, “One plus one is two.”

“Good job,” said my husband. “What is one plus two?”

“I don't know.”

“Well, think about it for a minute.”

My daughter insisted she didn’t know.

“I think you can figure it out.”

“Daddy, I can’t, because I haven’t learned three yet!”

—Carolyn M. / San Jose, CA



The View from the Flip Side

My 7-year-old son Ryan informed me, with a sad face, that the next page in his math book introduced a new concept.

“Something new!” I replied, enthusiastically. “How fun—I get to teach a math lesson!”

He sighed and exclaimed, “Mom, for you the glass is full. For me, it’s empty!”

—Julia S. / Gardena, CA



Things Sure have Changed

While teaching my 7-year-old about the Oregon Trail, I asked him why he thought that most of the trail was located near rivers. Naturally, I was expecting an answer about the rivers being a source of water for travelers.

But my son’s response very practical: “Because they didn’t have a GPS!”

—Betsy D. / Cincinnati, OH



Like, that was Easy

While trying to teach my 9-year-old son Caleb about similes, I gave him an assignment that frustrated him. I asked him to write three similes, but he just sat there, stumped.

“Aw, Mom,” my simile-challenged son finally vented, “it’s easy for you! You can spit out words like a vending machine!”

—Lisa S. / Ben Lomond, CA



Hand-y Replacements

During a snack break from her math lesson, my daughter cut her thumb in the process of slicing an apple and claimed she couldn’t possibly finish writing her assignment with her injured thumb.

I said it was okay because we needed to go run some errands. “Maybe while we are out we can get you a new thumb,” I joked.

“Where will we get it?” replied my quick-witted daughter. “At the second-hand store?”

—Lucie C. / Napavine, WA



Classroom in the Clubhouse

Courtesy of the Family

Last spring, our family had a special blessing from God when a wren decided to build her nest in our girls’ club-house kitchenette. Our four daughters rejoiced in this addition, exulting when the mama wren laid five tiny eggs. Every day, four girls—to a mama wren’s dismay—lovingly checked the eggs. After weeks of anticipation, the eggs hatched and our girls enjoyed two more weeks of watching five scraggly little peeping things grow feathers and change from ugly ducklings into beautiful miniatures of their mother. When the day came for them to fledge, only one of the five birds had the ability and courage to leap out of the tall clubhouse to the nearest branch. So each girl was able to gently cup a bird in her little hands and take it out for an assisted “lift off” into its new life outside.

If our children had been away at school, they would have missed the joy of this natural wonder going on right in our backyard!

—Tim & Tami B. / Westminster, MD