The Home School Court Report
Vol. XXV
No. 4
Cover
July/August
2009

In This Issue

SPECIALFEATURES
REGULARCOLUMNS
ANDTHEREST

Liberty’s Call Previous Page Next Page
by J. Caleb Dalton
- disclaimer -
The Two Taboos

Politics and religion. The two taboos were on the table. This late-night discussion with my friend began with political issues. Thankfully, we were pretty much on the same page. You know, “The government is spending too much,” “Why can I balance my budget but the government can’t?” and the consuming question of the night: “Why do people keep voting for those who legislate contrary to the interest of the nation?”

“Can we really do anything to make a difference?” my friend asked. That’s when the subject of religion came up—in a quote from one of our Founding Fathers.

John Quincy Adams John Quincy Adams, president of the United States (1825–1829), is one of the Founding Fathers studied in GenJ’s online civics classes.
...
“DUTY IS OURS;
RESULTS
ARE GOD’S”
...

As deputy director for education at Generation Joshua, a division of HSLDA, I find myself pleasantly immersed in the writings of those who fought for their beliefs in the United States Revolution and created a system of government that they hoped would preserve freedom for future generations. One of the latest classes that GenJ has released for our members is the third and final installment in a series that highlights the lives, writings, and philosophies of 30 U.S. Founders. The Founders were not perfect, but many were wise, and their words offer timeless insight applicable to today’s society almost two and a half centuries after they were penned.

Generation Joshua’s online classes are geared toward training students to understand how the government operates today, to think critically, and to apply timeless principles from the Founding Era to their modern lives and communities. Through courses covering constitutional law, the Great Awakening, and the lives and writings of the Founders themselves, Generation Joshua equips students with the philosophy they need to persuasively engage today’s political culture and safeguard tomorrow’s freedoms.

History is like a relay race. Each person runs part of the race and passes the baton to the next runner. For homeschoolers, passing the baton means effectively communicating truths and lessons from the past to those who will keep running the race after us. Today, we enjoy relative freedom to teach and train our children each in our own way. To keep that freedom, we must train the next generation to understand the value of and to preserve not only the freedom to homeschool but also many other freedoms threatened today. Thomas Jefferson’s words have been popularly summarized, “A democratic society depends on an informed and educated citizenry.” I would add an active citizenry.

We are called to educated action and to train our children in educated action—it is our pleasure and our duty. To answer the question my friend posed—Can we make a difference?—well, the answer comes from the first person featured in our latest online class. Words attributed to this leader, John Quincy Adams, have become my life’s motto: “Duty is ours; results are God’s.”

So you see, the two taboos in an increasingly politically correct society are really not all that scary (at least among friends). Our duty is before us. Let’s carry the baton while it is ours, making sure to pass it to the next runners in line.


About the author

J. Caleb Dalton is Generation Joshua’s deputy director of education.