The Home School Court Report
Vol. XXIII
No. 5
Cover
September/October
2007

In This Issue

SPECIALFEATURES
REGULARCOLUMNS
ANDTHEREST

A Contrario Sensu
On the Other Hand
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- disclaimer -
Send Us Your Story

We are looking for humorous, warm anecdotes and true stories illustrating that homeschooling is the best educational alternative around.

All material printed in the Court Report will be credited, and the contributor will receive a $10 coupon good toward any HSLDA publication of his choice. Submissions may be edited for space. Please be aware that we cannot return photographs.

Mail submissions to:

Attn: Stories, HSLDA
P.O. Box 3000
Purcellville, VA 20134

Or email us (include "Stories" in the subject line) at: ComDept@hslda.org



IF I HAVE TO SAY IT ONE MORE TIME. . .

We are a large family with seven children, and seem to stick out wherever we go—when I take the kids out on errands during the day, they often get asked why they aren’t in school.

One day, I was checking my 8-year-old’s grammar workbook, where she was learning to capitalize proper nouns. She had answered the question, “Name of your school,” with, “We homeschool, OK?” I suppose she was exasperated at the number of times she’s been asked why she isn’t in school!

—by Sharon K. / Poughkeepsie, NY



LET’S GET THIS SHOW ON THE ROAD

My husband was reviewing our 6-year-old daughter’s end-of-year kindergarten progress when, with frustration in her voice, she said, “Dad, can we just get to the hard stuff?”

I knew my first year of homeschooling had been a success!

—by Lauren T. / Cincinnati, OH



LET THE PUNISHMENT FIT THE CRIME

A few months ago we studied kings and queens and had a great time delving into the Tudors. One of the things we learned about was the harsh rule of Henry the Eighth and the strict punishments he meted out for small crimes.

My oldest daughter, who had just turned 4, soaked up quite a bit more of the unit than I had first imagined. One morning she was sitting at the top of the stairs crying . . . really loudly, so as to get my attention.

“What’s wrong?” I asked.

She replied that her brother had stolen her journal—“The pretty pink one that is mine and mine alone and can you please get it back for me because I love it, and want to sleep with it and write in it, and I bought it with my own money, and it isn’t his . . . (inhale . . . long pause) . . . MAMA! . . . Cut off his hand!”

She showed us that you can absorb history and play with toys on the floor at the same time.

—by Rebecca A. / Broken Arrow, OK



MY SCHOOLROOM

My schoolroom is an interesting place,
with books on shelves and posters of Space.

If you enter, you’ll find us working hard,
On spelling, reading, and multiplication cards.

Our Mom is the teacher, she is the best;
She teaches better than all the rest.

We try to keep our own desks clean,
To make our schoolroom more serene.

We must be quiet until we’re done,
then we can go have some fun.

We really like our schoolroom a lot.
We would choose it on the spot.

—by Jackie H., 12 / Highland, IN



WHO NEEDS SUMMER VACATION?

I am blessed to be a travel writer and take my kids on most of my free press trips. Last year, my kids and I visited nine states and three countries. By the age of 7, one of my daughters had studied and toured 47 states, 3 countries, and she had taken 5 cruises abroad.

On one of our trips last fall, we were riding a trolley in Maryland when another passenger began interrogating my middle daughter, Faith, as to why she was not in school.

Smiling politely, Faith replied, “Actually I’m always in school. Yesterday we visited the Pennsylvania Amish Country; today we are going to the Smithsonian and the memorials, and tomorrow we visit George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate.”

The lady looked a bit puzzled and asked if my daughter missed not having summer vacation.

“No, ma’am,” said Faith. “We went to Belize, Mexico, and the rainforest this summer when I was wasn’t playing Barbies with my friends.”

—by Carmel M. / Dobbins, CA



WEIGHING THE CONSEQUENCES

We strive to have fresh, healthy food choices available in our home, and we’ve spent countless hours discussing the benefits and ill effects of different foods. For the most part, the children seem to understand and agree. They do not often complain, and we occasionally allow them to indulge in some less healthy food.

Recently, we attended a Fourth of July celebration where junk food was abundant. After a couple of hours of playing and eating, my husband met up with our youngest child, Joel. He had his hands full with a plate of tortilla chips smothered in canned cheese. Looking up at his dad, Joel remarked, “Dad, I think I am going to be sick tomorrow . . . but I think it’s worth it!”

—by the M Family / Clovis, CA



THE REAL GOTHAM CITY

One of the best things about homeschooling is the way younger children learn from their older siblings. As a family, we play a game on our car trips to see who can yell out a state’s capital first. Occasionally, my 3-year-old son beats his two older sisters by yelling out “Montgomery” for Alabama or “Dover” for Delaware. But my all-time favorite is his capital for Louisiana: “Batman Rouge.”

—by Charlene M. / North Royalton, OH



A BREATH OF FRESH AIR

When our 14-year-old son, Alex, gasped in surprise at something my husband, Ray, said, Ray replied with his favorite line: “Save some air for the rest of us.”

Recalling a recent homeschool geography lesson, Alex shot back, “There’s plenty of air outside—it’s a renewable resource!”

Alex got a high-five for applied geography!

—by Kim L. / Rancho Cucamonga, CA