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VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 5
- disclaimer -
September / October 2005


FEATURES
You can homeschool through high school
Contest attracts young poets

DEPARTMENTS
Freedom watch
From the heart
Across the states
Active cases
Members only
Liberty's call
About campus
President's page

ET AL.

On the other hand: a contrario sensu

HSLDA social services contact policy/A plethora of forms

HSLDA legal inquiries

Prayer & praise


 «
  ON THE OTHER HAND  

» 


A CONTRARIO SENSU

School's a treat!

One morning while eating breakfast, my 10-year-old, Caleb, idly began doodling on a napkin. When I found his napkin later, it read, "My mommy spoils us with cake, candy, and school."

— Allison Costa
Waterville, VT

Time warp

While studying the Pony Express with our 3rd-grade son, Eric, we explained that the horse-and-rider mail service had been used in the relatively uninhabited area between Sacramento, California, and St. Joseph, Missouri. Trying to help Eric grasp this fact, we asked him, "Imagine that you lived in Sacramento and mailed a letter to a relative in New York. Once your letter arrived in St. Joseph, Missouri, by the Pony Express, how do you think your letter would get to New York?"

"I'm not sure," he replied after a few seconds of thought. "Maybe they would send it by fax?"

— Steve & Kathy Nolan
Kingston, TN

One long day, one long word

Our family had enjoyed several days of sightseeing in Washington, D.C. After a thorough tour of the Air and Space Museum's Enola Gay exhibit, 7-year-old Erin carefully completed a visitor comments card and handed it to me. It read:

I really like the Air and Space Museam, but I'm really tired.
Love, Erin
P.S. I need to add Museam to my spelling list.

— Jennifer Hansen
Lebanon, NH

Literacy pays

When my son was in kindergarten, he enjoyed attending weekly Awana meetings at our church. One evening, Eric proudly showed me a purchase from the Awana "store," where the children used their points to purchase dollar store-type items.

"What a great bracelet!" I said, suppressing a smile, when I saw what he had bought. "Did your leader tell you what it says?"

"No."

Not wanting to squelch his joy, I told him gently, "It says Girl Power!"

Eric gave a hesitant laugh. As he walked away, I heard him quietly mumbling, "Man, I have got to learn how to read!"

— Carrie Meyers
Tipton, IA

Prophetic spelling

One day, my children and I were reading the Bible story of the ten plagues that fell on the Egyptians. I mentioned to my 7-year-old son, Josiah, that gnat was an interesting word because it was spelled with a g.

Wanting to take advantage of this teachable moment, I said, "So some day, when you have gnat as a spelling word, how are you going to spell it?"

"Wrong," was his quick and certain reply!

— Nancy Baber
Escondido, CA

From my angle . . .

All parents dread the familiar complaints each time kids must sit next to each other in the family car. I knew my daughter had done enough geometry for the day when her 6-year-old brother annoyed her during a drive and she called out, "Mom, he's bisecting my plane again!"

— Karen Stoner
Dillsburg, PA

Removing the scales from our eyes

When our son William was about 10 years old, our family was reading about the early church in the book of Acts. One day William approached me with a very perplexed expression.

"Mom, are we Jews or reptiles?" he asked.

After a good laugh, we did a quick vocabulary review.

— Cathi Updike
Oelrichs, SD

Mastering efficiency

As we were finishing up the school year, we allowed our sons some liberty in time management to complete two projects. My animal-loving 9-year-old poured his energy into a presentation about dogs, barely giving any attention to his history project.

I gently reminded Jonathan of the importance of working on both projects and asked when he planned to tackle history. "Tomorrow!" he responded cheerfully, adding with a sigh, "Tomorrow is a labor-saving device."

— Carolyn & Trevor Wallis
Valencia, CA

Enlightened reader

Ten-year-old Austen, my avid reader, came up with a resourceful solution to the nightly problem of hearing "Lights out!" when he was in the middle of a good book. He taught himself Braille. Now he regularly orders books in Braille from the library, and it's almost impossible to catch him reading after bedtime!

— Lori Anderson
Sacramento, CA

Homeschooled a child today?

As we began our second year of homeschooling, my oldest son was in 2nd grade and his younger brother was just entering kindergarten. Three weeks into the new school year, my kindergartener became frustrated when it seemed he always completed his work in just a couple of hours. He wanted to spend more one-on-one time with Mom.

One day he crossed his arms on his little chest and announced, "This feels like last year when you homeschooled Jacob and you didn't love me." From that moment, I was convinced homeschooling was the way to go!

— Connie Fox
Rapid City, SD



Send us your story

We are looking for humorous, warm anecdotes and true stories illustrating that homeschooling is the best educational alternative around.

All material printed in the Court Report will be credited, and the contributor will receive a $10 coupon good toward any HSLDA publication of his choice. Submissions may be edited for space. Please be aware that we cannot return photographs.

Mail submissions to:

Attn: Stories, HSLDA

P.O. Box 3000

Purcellville, VA 20134

Or email us (include "Stories" in the subject line) at:

ComDept@hslda.org