Home School Court Report
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VOLUME XX, NUMBER 1
- disclaimer -
January / February 2004


FEATURES
Can Judicial Tyranny Be Stopped?

DEPARTMENTS
Freedom watch
From the heart

The difference made by "little things"

Impact of the Widows Curriculum Scholarship Fund

From the director
Across the states
Active cases
Members only

New email confirmation

Support homeschooling when you shop online
About campus

PHC in the news
President's page

ET AL.

HSLDA social services contact policy/A plethora of forms

HSLDA legal inquiries

Prayer & Praise


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  LEGAL/LEGISLATIVE UPDATES  

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ACROSS THE STATES

AL · AK · CA · CO · FL · ID · IL ·IN · KY · LA · ME · MO · NV · NJ · NM · NY · OH · OK · OR · RI · TN · TX · VT · VA · WI · WY

KENTUCKY

Hopkins County glass "half-full"

"Requirement 13" of the Hopkins County homeschool policy has been notorious for years. It states, "The Home School will certify at the end of each nine weeks grading period that the student(s) is still being instructed per the guidelines outlined." On November 3, 2003, the Hopkins County Board of Education addressed this unlawful and unenforceable requirement by requiring homeschoolers to report twice a year instead of four times.

This change reflects poorly on the board of education. Hopkins County has never effectively tried to enforce its unlawful demands, and homeschoolers there routinely ignore the requirement. School officials know that they have no legal power to force homeschoolers to report several times per year, but instead of admitting that the policy is wrong, they have simply decided to enforce it half as often.

For Hopkins County families, this amendment is no joke. They realize that their elected school officials have knowingly chosen to continue a demand that cannot be justified. This step in the right direction does not alter the fact that the county is still making illegal demands of homeschoolers. Please pray for these families as they stand firm on the front lines of freedom.

— Scott W. Somerville