Home School Court Report
Current Issue | Archives | Advertising | About | Search
VOLUME XVIII, NUMBER 4
- disclaimer -
JULY / AUGUST 2002
Cover
Previous Issue  C  O  N  T  E  N  T  S  


Cover Story
Can they get a job?

Home school entrepreneurs

Home schooler youngest Geography Bee winner ever

Ending college discrimination

Special Insert
Trumpet of Liberty

Regular Features
Active cases

Freedom watch

Notes to members

A Contrario Sensu

Prayer and praise

President's page

F.Y.I
HSLDA social services contact policy

Across the States
State by State

N  A  T  I  O  N  A  L     C  E  N  T  E  R     R  E  P  O  R  T  S
Freedom Watch

Introducing the John & Abigail Adams Fellowship

The first John & Abigail Adams Fellowships in Parental Rights and Educational Freedom have been awarded to a Saint Louis University Ph.D. candidate and a University of New Mexico senior.

HSLDA's National Center for Home Education launched this new non-resident fellowship program by email in March 2002. An effort to encourage scholarly research on the rights of parents to direct the upbringing and education of their children, the Adams Fellowship program is administered by its own board of advisors.

Brian Matz
Fellowship recipient Brian Matz, a doctoral student studying historical theology at Saint Louis University, has proposed to research and report on moral formation in education. "Many surveys of home-schooling families in the U.S. indicate that the number one reason parents choose this form of education is the opportunity it affords them to provide for the moral formation of their children." Brian said in his proposal.

He will seek to address the research gap first by documenting historical evidence in the Christian tradition affirming a parent's right and responsibility to morally form their children and, second, to present a proactive model of moral formation that will enable home schooling parents to better define their mission.

Sarah Hunt
Sarah Hunt, a political science senior at the University of New Mexico, has proposed to explore the issue of compulsory attendance and the decline of freedom in America. Her research will look into whether or not the introduction of compulsory public school attendance has created a culture in which Americans, having already given themselves over to a government-run school system, are becoming increasingly inclined to hand over their rights as parents and citizens to the government. "Most policy makers and citizens have long since accepted compulsory school attendance as a public necessity," Sarah wrote in her proposal.

For more information, go to www.adamsfellowship.org or email adamsfellowship@hslda.org.