The Home School Court Report
VOLUME XVI, NUMBER 6
- disclaimer -
NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2000
Cover
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Cover Story
Erasing the Barriers for Children with Special Learning Needs

Special Features

An Interview with the Forstroms

An Interview with Betty Statnick: HSLDA’s Special Needs Coordinator

National Center Reports

Will the 2000 Elections Impact Home School Freedom?

106th Congress Wrap-Up

Across the States

State by State

Regular Features

Active Cases

Prayer and Praise

Notes to Members

Presidents Page

F. Y. I.

Association News

An Affirmative Plan: Debate Tournament

H  O  M  E     S  C  H  O  O  L  I  N  G     N  E  W  S     F  R  O  M
Across the States
AL · CA · CO · DC · DE · FL · GA · HI · IL · IN · KS · MA · MD · MI · MN · MO · MS · MT · NC · NH · NV · NY · OH · SD · TN · TX · VT · WV · WY

Legal Contacts September/October 2000

Michigan


Truancy Contacts4
Social Services7
Legislation3
Special Education1
Home School Law42

TOTAL57

February thru September

419
Michigan

Home Schoolers Harassed

In the Mechasta-Oceola Intermediate School District, a new truant officer insisted that a home school mother allow him inside to see her lesson plans, teaching materials, textbooks, and corrected school work. When this Home School Legal Defense Association member replied that she needed to talk with her attorney first, the truant officer stated that if he could not see her teaching materials, he would make sure charges were filed and she would then have to show her curriculum materials to a judge. He left, but soon returned, still insisting on seeing her curricula. After peering through the window, seeing the children sitting at a table doing their studies, and talking to the mother once again, the officer was finally satisfied.

HSLDA reported the truant officer’s intimidating conduct to the superintendent and reminded him that Michigan law is clear: curriculum approval is not required and families do not have to prove that they are conducting home instruction. The superintendent assured HSLDA that he wanted a positive relationship with home schoolers and he did not expect such an incident to happen again.

Child Welfare Investigation

One Saturday in October, HSLDA received an emergency phone call from a member family who had a child welfare worker at their door demanding entry. She refused to reveal the allegations against the family unless she was allowed inside. The father handed the phone to the social worker and HSLDA informed her that we needed to know the allegations, but we would allow her to view the children through the glass door.

She said, “I’m getting in one way or another,” and finally, “I’m calling the police.” Meanwhile, HSLDA called her supervisor, explaining that the social worker was refusing to cooperate with the family and was making unlawful demands. Within the hour, the supervisor contacted the social worker, who was sitting in her car.

Reluctantly, the woman returned to the front door, informed the parents that the police would not be coming and revealed that the allegations had to do with a diaper rash on their three-year-old. She did not enter the home or interrogate the children, but instead agreed to HSLDA’s offer to provide a doctor’s certificate of health for the child, with the expectation that the situation would be resolved. — Christopher J. Klicka