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VOLUME XVI, NUMBER 6
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NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2000
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Cover Story
Erasing the Barriers for Children with Special Learning Needs

Special Features

An Interview with the Forstroms

An Interview with Betty Statnick: HSLDA’s Special Needs Coordinator

National Center Reports

Will the 2000 Elections Impact Home School Freedom?

106th Congress Wrap-Up

Across the States

State by State

Regular Features

Active Cases

Prayer and Praise

Notes to Members

Presidents Page

F. Y. I.

Association News

An Affirmative Plan: Debate Tournament

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Across the States
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Colorado

School Districts Exceed Law

A Home School Legal Defense Association member family in Bennett, who had already sent in their notice of intent, were informed by the school district that additional information was required.

The Bennett School District indicated that “effective January 1, 2001, the state is requiring the school district to have more specific information on the students that are being home schooled.” In addition to what is required by law, the district wanted the grade level and date of birth of their home school child. HSLDA explained to the district that the law requires that the parent “shall certify, in writing, only a statement containing the name, age, place of residence, and number of hours of attendance of each child enrolled in said program.”

During the drafting of the home-based education bill in 1994, HSLDA, together with the legislators and Concerned Parents of Colorado, purposely left out grade level in order to allow for maximum flexibility for the home school program. One of the many benefits of home schooling is the flexibility to adjust the curricula to best fit the needs of the child, enabling the child to excel, oftentimes beyond his grade level. — Christopher J. Klicka