The Home School Court Report
VOLUME XVI, NUMBER 1
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JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2000
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Cover Story
Going on Offense

Special Features
10 Reasons to Join HSLDA

A Legislative Review of the First Session of the 106th Congress

National Center Reports
FBI Project Megiddo

U.S. Census

Across the States
State by State

Regular Features
Active Cases

Prayer and Praise

A Contrario Sensu

Around the Globe

Notes to Members

Press Clippings

President’s Page

O  N     T  H  E     O  T  H  E  R     H  A  N  D
a contrario sensu
The Only Kind of School

Even before we had children, my husband and I had decided that we would home school them. Our oldest son, Isaac, is now in the second grade, and even though he has friends who are in school, his concept of school is only of a home school with Mom and Dad as teachers. This concept became very evident during a history lesson. The lesson discussed the types of communities we live in, showing pictures of various community helpers that he was to identify. I couldn’t help but laugh when he correctly identified them all until he came to the picture of a teacher with a young boy, and he promptly said, “A mommy teaching her son.” ;

—Kathy Matson, Baldwinville, MA

What a Heart!

My eight-year-old son, Isaac, and I had the opportunity along with another home schooled family to observe the dissection of a cow’s heart. After commenting on the size of the cow’s heart, which was about the size of a football, the father stated that our hearts were about the size of our fists.

After returning home from our science field trip, Isaac came in from play with an exciting thought that had occurred to him, “Mom! Mom! Can you imagine the size of that cow’s fist!” he said. The name “Isaac” means laughter in Hebrew, and that’s what I did! I guess we need to visit a farm.

—Marilyn G. Hall, Chesterfield, VA

Hooky from Home

I had just concluded a pleasant home school morning by reading a chapter of Tom Sawyer to three of my daughters. So I was surprised and a little disheartened when five-year-old Muriel announced that she would like to start attending school.

None of the girls had expressed this desire before now. Was I challenging her too much? Or not enough? Was I not cut out for home schooling after all? I tried to rein in my thoughts as I asked, nonchalantly, why? “I want to go to school so I can play hooky!” she replied.

—Sandy Hague, Berne, IN

A Place to Chill, Maybe

I was sitting on the couch with my young daughter, Elisabeth, going over her phonics lesson. She was learning her “ch” sound. As we encountered such words as “chin” or “chip,” I would give her hints by making up a sentence that related to the word. For instance, for the word “chip” I said, “This is something you love to munch on.” She would then begin sounding out the word: “ch-ch-i-p, chip!” With the word “chin” I said, “This is where I am going to kiss you!” She said, “ch-ch-i-n, chin!” and then proceeded to give me a chin kiss. When we came to the word “chill,” I said, “This is what happens to food when we put it in our refrigerator.” She exclaimed, “Rotten!”

—Jennifer Strackbein, Aransas Pass, TX

Moving Along

Our family had just finished enjoying dinner with a missions-minded family from our church. As our five-year-old daughter Kathryn played quietly nearby, they began speaking to us of opportunities on the mission field in Africa. After a few minutes, Kathryn wandered over to the group of adults.

“So Kathryn,” I queried, “How would you like to move to Africa and be missionaries for Jesus?”

“Oh, Mommy, we couldn’t move to Africa! I’m home schooled!” After much laughter, we explained that our school could move with us.

—Heather Henriquez, Windsor, CT


S E N D   U S   Y O U R   S T O R Y

     Humorous, warm anecdotes and true stories illustrating that home schooling is the best educational alternative around.
     All material printed in the Court Report will be credited, and the contributor will receive a free HSLDA publication of his choice. Submissions may be edited for space.

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Attn: Stories, HSLDA
P.O. Box 3000
Purcellville, VA 20134

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