House Bill 368: Relative to Annual Goals and Curriculum in a Home Education Program

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Last Updated: January 14, 2010
House Bill 368: Relative to Annual Goals and Curriculum in a Home Education Program
Sponsors:
State Representative Judith E. Day (D); Amendment Sponsored by Minority Of Education Committee
Summary:

11 Reasons to oppose H.B. 367 & 368 >>

House Bill 368 was introduced in 2009 and then retained by the house Education Committee as a vehicle to "study" New Hampshire's homeschool law. It was retained after the more onerous bill HB 367 had been killed. The House Education Committee reported out a recommendation of Inexpedient to Legislate by a majority and bipartisan vote of 14-6. However proponents of increasing regulation on homeschoolers in New Hampshire have essentially resurrected the onerous HB 367 and are seeking to pass it as an amended version of HB 368. If passed, HB 368 would make New Hampshire's homeschool law the most burdensome in the Country.

When it was introduced in 2009 HB 368 only required parents who are homeschooling their children to include in their notice of intent to homeschool a statement affirming that they will provide instruction in all of the subjects required by New Hampshire law. These subjects are: Science, Mathmateics, Language, government, history of the constitutions of New Hampshire and the United States, and an exposure to and appreciation of art and music. The bill also required superintendents to send a copy of the law and regulations to homeschooling parents.

HSLDA's Position:
Oppose.

For the second year in a row a legislative study committee has recommended not to make any changes to New Hampshire's homeschool law. New Hampshire's hoemschool law has been functioning well for nearly 20 years, and no changes are needed. If passed, this bill would make New Hampshire's homeschool law the most burdensome in the entire country. No other state requires testing and a portfolio review for every child every year.

Action Requested:
None at this time
Status:

1/8/2009 (House) Introduced and referred to education committee
1/27/2009 (House) Public Hearing: 2/11/2009 at 1:00 p.m. in Representative’s Hall
2/19/2009 (House) Executive Session: 3/5/2009 10:00 a.m. Legislative Office Building room 207
3/5/2009 (House) The Education Committee voted to retain the bill to study “home
education” in New Hampshire. This means the committee will study the legislation and must issue a report by Novmeber 1
4/14/2009 (House) Retained Bill – full committee work session: 4/21/2009 11:00 a.m. Legislative Office Building 207
4/22/2009 (House) Retained bill – Evaluation and Records subcommittee work session: 4/29/2009 10:00 a.m. in LOB 207
4/29/2009 (House) Retained bill – Definitions subcommittee work session: 5/6/2009 8:30 a.m. in LOB 207
5/21/2009 (House) Retained bill – Survey to Superintendents Subcommittee work session: 6/2/2009 10:00 a.m. 207
6/2/2009 (House) Retained bill – Survey to Superintendents Subcommittee work session: 6/23/2009 10:00 a.m. LOB 307
6/10/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Time/date change: Survey to Superintendents Subcommittee work Session 6/23/2009 1:00 p.m. LOB 207
6/10/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Subcommittee meeting on 6/23/2009 CANCELLED
9/02/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Survey to Superintendents Subcommittee work session: 9/29/2009 10:00 a.m. LOB 207
9/28/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Notification Subcommittee Work Session: 10/13/2009 1:00 p.m. LOB 207
10/13/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Evaluation & Records Subcommittee Work Session: 10/20/2009 10:00 a.m. LOB 205
10/13/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Survey to Superintendents Subcommittee Work Session: 10/20/2009 10:00 a.m. LOB 207
10/20/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Evaluation & Records Subcommittee Work Session: 10/28/2009 1:30 p.m. LOB 207
10/20/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Probational Appeals Subcommittee Work Session: 10/28/2009 2:00 p.m. or after session LOB 207
10/20/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Definitions Subcommittee Work Session: 10/28/2009 2:00 p.m. or after session LOB 205
10/21/2009 (House) -- CANCELLED-- Retained Bill – Executive Session: 12/1/2009 10:00 a.m. LOB 207
10/21/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Definitions Subcommittee Work Session: 11/10/2009 1:00 p.m. LOB 207
10/30/2009 (House) Retained Bill – Executive Session: 11/19/2009 10:00 a.m. LOB 207
12/01/2009 (House) Majority Committee Report: Inexpedient to Legislate (14-6)
12/01/2009 (House) Minority Committee Report: Ought to Pass with Amendment
12/01/2009 (House) Full House vote scheduled for January 6, 2010
1/6/2010 (House) House did not take up HB 368 at the January 6 session. The House is scheduled to vote on January 13, 2010.
1/13/2010 (House) The House voted HB 368 ITL by a vote of 324-34. The bill has been killed.

Background:

Anti-homeschooling policy makers in New Hampshire are determined to make New Hampshire’s homeschool law the most burdensome in the country. Even after the House Education Committee voted by a 14-6 majority recommending no changes to New Hampshire’s homeschool law, advocates of increased regulation for homeschoolers have resurrected HB 367 submitting it as an “amendment” to HB 368. HB 367 was the most onerous bill that was voted down by the house last year in a deal that left HB 368 alive as a “vehicle to study” the New Hampshire homeschool law that has been working so well for the last 20years. If passed, HB 368 would make New Hampshire’s homeschool law the most restrictive in the nation. HB 368 is scheduled for debate on the floor of the House on January 6, 2010.

The proposed amendments to HB 368 add a number of requirements, including that instruction be “systematic and thorough," change the subjects “government and history” to be called “social studies”, adds the words “written notification" in place of “notify,” requires an annual portfolio review for every homeschooled child in New Hampshire every year in addition to testing for every child every year (ordering the DOE to make further rules about portfolio reviews), disallows parents who are certified teachers from evaluating their own children, complicates the portfolio evaluation submission process and orders the DOE to make further rules about the submission of portfolios, and requires that participating agencies submit test scores of homeschooled children to the department of education. The text of the proposed amendments can be viewed under “other resources” below.

 Other Resources

Bill Text

Bill History