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Wisconsin

August 25, 2006

Senate Joint Resolution 53: Marriage Amendment

Author:
Senators S. Fitzgerald, Stepp, Roessler, Lazich, Leibham, Kanavas, Schultz, A. Lasee, Reynolds, Grothman and Zien;

Cosponsored by Representatives Gundrum, Nischke, Krawczyk, Suder, J. Fitzgerald, Towns, Owens, Gard, Huebsch, McCormick, Hundertmark, M. Williams, Van Roy, Bies, LeMahieu, Honadel, Pettis, Nass, Ott, F. Lasee, Hahn, Kestell, Lothian, Hines, Gottlieb, Townsend, Gunderson, Kreibich, Petrowski, Meyer, Jeskewitz, Freese, Vos, Kleefisch, Nerison, Ballweg, Moulton, Kerkman, Loeffelholz, Albers, Mursau, Pridemore and Montgomery.

Summary:
To create section 13 of article XIII of the constitution; relating to: providing that only a marriage between one man and one woman shall be valid or recognized as a marriage in this state (2nd consideration).

Status:

12/06/2005 (Senate) Ordered immediately messaged
03/22/2006 (Senate) Deposited in the office of the Secretary of State
03/22/2006 Enrolled Joint Resolution 30

HSLDA's Position:
No action requested at this time.

Background:
Your right to homeschool rests on another freedom: the freedom to direct the education and upbringing of your children. Underlying your right to homeschool are parental rights, which are supported by the sanctity of marriage. Anything that undermines marriage may ultimately undermine parental rights and therefore threaten your freedom to homeschool.

Amending the Wisconsin constitution will protect marriage from activist state judges. Without this amendment, an activist judge, out of step with the citizens, will one day redefine marriage for everyone.

Thank you for standing with us for freedom. We will be notifying you next year as to the exact timing when the assembly will be voting for this marriage amendment.

 Other Resources

Feb.-9-2006—Wisconsin—Calls Needed in Support of Marriage

Mar.-23-2006—Wisconsin—Your Calls Worked to Help Pass Marriage Amendment!

Bill Text

Bill History