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Nevada

June 3, 2003

Assembly Bill 264: Educational Records and Other Matters

Sponsor:
Assemblywoman Christina R. Giunchigliani (D), District 9

Summary:
Assembly Bill 264 began as a seventy-one-page bill that, among other things, would have required homeschoolers to take Nevada's "achievement and proficiency examinations." After strong protest by homeschoolers, AB 264 was heavily amended and the homeschool testing section was deleted. When AB 264 reached the Ways and Means Committee, which is chaired by AB 264's primary sponsor, Assemblywoman Christina Giunchigliani, the bill was radically amended again. Since none of the new provisions significantly affect homeschoolers, HSLDA is neutral regarding this bill.

Status:
03/07/2003 Introduced.
03/10/2003 To Assembly Committee on Education.
03/10/2003 To Assembly Committee on Ways and Means.
04/09/2003 Amended in Education Committee. Do pass as amended
04/21/2003 From Concurrent Committee on Education: Amend, and do pass as amended.
04/22/2003 To Concurrent Committee on Ways and Means.
05/21/2003 From Concurrent Committee on Ways and Means: Amend, and do pass as amended.
05/23/2003 Passed, as amended. (Yeas: 34, Nays: 7, Excused: 1). To Senate.
05/24/2003 Referred to Committee on Finance.
06/03/2003 The 72nd Regular Session adjourned Sine Die. AB 264 is now dead.

Action Requested:
None.
Background The legislation was originally seventy-one pages long, and contained too many provisions to detail here. Here are a few of the more controversial provisions:
-Section 2 authorizes daycare programs at public schools.
-Section 3 authorizes school-based clinics.
-Section 4 abolishes the public school districts in Lincoln County, Esmeralda County, and Storey County.
-Section 12 adds five more days of mandatory instruction in charter schools.
-Section 15 requires magnet schools in each district.
-Section 24 requires state achievement and proficiency tests to be administered on the weekends rather than during the regular school week.
-Section 33 requires each licensed teacher to work eight paid hours per school day during the school year.
-Section 48 mandates all-day kindergarten for "at-risk" children. "At-risk" means the child is eligible for free or reduced-price lunches.
-Section 49 requires homeschoolers to "take the achievement and proficiency examinations pursuant to NRS 389.015," and requires that the results of these examinations be submitted to the Department of Education.
-Section 50 requires each school district to "establish a policy that requires pupils to wear school uniforms."
-Sections 55-62 establish a whole new system of public loans for teacher training.
-Section 64 appropriates one million dollars to administer examinations on weekends rather than during the regular school week.
-Section 65 appropriates one hundred thousand dollars for loans for teacher training.
-Section 66 appropriates one hundred thousand dollars for each of the next two school years to reimburse teachers who are specializing in certain fields.
-Section 68 appropriates five million dollars to pay for "enhanced compensation for certain teachers."
-Section 70 requires school districts to pay teachers at least thirty thousand dollars per year.

By the time the Assembly Education Committee finished amending this bill, the only sections that survived were 12, 13, 18, 19, 41, 68, and 70, and even those had some amendments made to them. Thus, the only controversial items left were Section 12, which adds five more days of mandatory instruction for charter schools, Section 68, which appropriates five million dollars to pay for enhanced compensation for certain teachers, and Section 70, which requires school districts to pay teachers at least thirty thousand dollars per year.

In the Ways and Means Committee, Section 12, 13, 18, and 19 were eliminated. Section 41 survives. Section 68 now appropriates nine million dollars, rather than five million dollars for the "enhanced compensation for certain teachers." (Section 68 has been renumbered to be Section 13 in the amended bill.) The section requiring school districts to pay teachers at least thirty thousand dollars per year appears to have been dropped.

This bill is a good example of how legislation can go through astonishing changes as it moves from one committee to another. HSLDA will continue to monitor the progress of this bill.

HSLDA's Position:
Neutral, since the section affecting homeschools has been removed.

 Other Resources
4/4/2003 - Nevada--Your Calls Needed to Stop Homeschool Testing

Bill Text

Bill History