Maryland
HOME | LAWS | ORGANIZATIONS | CASES | LEGISLATION | HEADLINES | COMMON CORE
Maryland

March 30, 2005

Senate Bill 913: An Act Raising the Compulsory Attendance Age

Sponsors:
Senators McFadden, Hollinger, Gladden, Hafer, Hooper, Jones, and Schrader.

Summary:
Senate Bill 913 would have raised the compulsory attendance to age 18 from the current age of 16. The bill would have created an exception if the student has a high school certificate or diploma. It was given an unfavorable report by the Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs committee, resulting in the defeat of the bill.

Status:

02/22/2005(Senate): Introduced, First Reading in the Senate Rules Committee.
02/24/2005(Senate): Re-Referred to the Education Health and Environmental Affairs Committee.
03/22/2005(Senate): Senate Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs Committee Hearing at 1:00 PM. Location: 2 West Hearing Room, Miller Senate Building, 11 Bladen Street, Annapolis, MD 21401-1991.
03/25/2005(Senate): Unfavorable Report by Education Health and Environmental Affairs.

HSLDA's Position:
Oppose!

Action Requested:
No more action is necessary.

Background:

  1. The statistics in the third paragraph come from the February, 2005, publication of the Manhattan Institute's Center for Civic Innovation, "Public High School Graduation and College-Readiness Rates: 1991-2002," by Dr. Jay P. Greene.
  2. States which compel attendance only to age 16 have higher high school completion rates than states that compel attendance to 17 or 18, on average. (Source: "Dropout Rates in the United States: 2000", pp. 9-10, 40-41; National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, Office of educational Research and Improvement, Doc. No. NCES 2002-114.)
  3. States which compel attendance only to age 16 also have lower dropout rates than states that compel attendance to 17 or 18, on average. (Source: same as above.)
  4. According to statistics published by the federal Office of Juvenile Justice and Dropout Prevention, a higher compulsory attendance age is not correlated to a reduction in juvenile crime.
  5. (Source: "Juvenile Arrests 1999." Washington, D.C.: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 2000.)

 Other Resources

Mar-21-2005 — Maryland--Calls Needed to Defeat Expansion of State Control Over Homeschoolers

HSLDA legislative toolbox

Bill Text   (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader)

Bill History